The Sumerian Noah Built an Ark

In a great story that has survived the ages, Gilgamesh, a great King of Sumer, went looking for eternal life. He did not succeed, but he did bring back a tale from Utnapishtim (whose name means The Faraway) — himself a great king thousands of years before — about the deluge.

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Enlil Rides Zu, a Huge Storm-Bird, His Firebreathing “Servant”

Enlil was the god of “breath, wind, loft and breadth (height and distance),” known for causing plants to grow and for inventing the mattock (an agricultural tool). He was also the god of weather, which came in handy: He helped create humans, then got fed up with all the noise and sent a deluge to polish everyone off.

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Quetzalcoatl

There’s a class of ancient stories about knowledge bringers. These were highly accomplished beings who came from the sky and taught the people the skills they needed to survive and thrive. Not surprisingly, many of these knowledge bringers are known as gods, usually creator gods. One of my favorite knowledge bringers is Quetzalcoatl. Lots of people have loved him through the ages, and love him still.

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The First Men Were Too Powerful

According to Graham Hancock in his book Fingerprints of the Gods, the Mayans’ advanced learning came from “the First Men, the creatures of Quetzalcoatl”, namely “Balam-Quitze (Jaguar with the Sweet Smile), Balam-Acab (Jaguar of the Night), Mahucutah (The Distinguished Name), and Iqui-Balam (Jaguar of the Moon).”

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The Mayan Calendar and Venus

The fact that the Mayan calendar failed the End of the World Test — the Fifth Sun didn’t end on December 21, 2012, as so many expected — doesn’t mean there’s not something going on there, and perhaps something catastrophic. But considering how wound up the calendar is with the movements of the planet Venus, as we will see, it seems at least possible that the calamity should be expected to involve that planet, as well as perhaps our own.

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